Week 32: of 52 films I’ve never seen

Nazi Zombie Death Tales” (2012)

(a.k.a. Battlefield Death Tales)

Directed & Written by James Eaves, Pat Higgins, Alan Ronald

Source print: DVD (UK).

Well, we’re back already with this British shoestring genre filmmaking trio’s follow-up to their awesome Bordello Death Tales. Unfortunately, this one is not so awesome. The real shining moment in this new anthology come from James Eaves’ first story, Medal of Horror, which boasts fine editing (once again), a totally unique plot catalyst, some steamy sex, an eye-patch-waring Nazi zombie, a killer kick-ass Nazi-femme fatale, a Nazi polygraph-slash-death robot, and a nicely ironic ending. Much like Stitchgirl’s service in the former Bordello Death Tales, Alan Ronald’s mid-story exercise is a humorous and inventive tribute to Burton’s Sleepy Hollow, this Death Tale taking place outside of Germany and back into jolly ol’ England, but after having to follow Eaves’ rollercoaster tale of action, horror, and exploitation, it’s not quite inventive enough to keep up with the pace. Which actually hurts me to say, because there was an obvious amount of effort poured into both stories. And even worse to say, it all starts going downhill from here… which brings us to the third, written and directed by Pat Higgins, who had the deserved cherry spot of the last story in Bordello – this time around, not so deserved. His Devils of the Blitz segment seemed completely rushed and un-fleshed out (in several respects). With his previous Bordello effort so cleverly written and dripping with talent, this turn of events was most unexpected by me. It’s the only story sans zombie Nazis (though probably not to the fault of Higgins, who likely thought, at the time of writing, he was producing a Battlefield Death Tale) but I highly doubt even if a horde of killer rotting Nazi zombies could’ve breathed any life into this last faltering segment. Too bad, because his lead actress Jess-Luisa Flynn sure seemed game. If anything, Higgins hasn’t forgotten his talent with directing actors. Overall, the entire anthology is a bit of a disappointment following this trio’s first effort. Stick with Bordello.

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